May-June 2018 newsletter

The May to June newsletter has been published electronically and sent out via post. This edition includes a Gary Lincoff obituary, book reviews and beginners corner along with information about upcoming events and more. You can access a pdf copy or look at the archives.

 

Species list from Post class walk in Salamander park on 04/14/2018

After the days mushroom education class many of the group joined the class teachers for a walk at Salamander park. The weather was warm and dry but fresh mushrooms were in short supply. We did find quite a few crusts, conks and parchments that are very hardy and overwinter. There were a couple of fresh specimens and we were lucky enough to find one of the most brightly colored spring mushrooms, Scarlet cup. There are two very similar species of Scarlet cup, Sarcoscypha austriaca and Sarcoscypha dudleyi. The only way to tell the difference between the two is by examining the spores under a microscope. Fortunately club Mycologist Garrett Taylor came equipped with a microscope and portable light source. A few minutes later he was viewing the spores and determined that we had found the Sarcoscypha austriaca species.

There were three other interesting finds, the polypore Daedaleopsis septentrionalis and an unknown crust mushroom that was growing over sticks and bark and actually gluing the substrate together, and a harry specimen growing on a stick. Daedaleopsis septentrionalis is related to Daedaleopsis confragosa, commonly known as the thin walled maze polypore. The pore shape is elongated in Daedaleopsis septentrionalis with very few cross walls and hence not so maze like. The pore surface will bruise pinkish-brown in fresh specimens of both species. Daedaleopsis septentrionalis only grows on Birch wood while Daedaleopsis confragosa grows on many hardwood species including Birch. The unknown crust mushroom is still unknown and there are a few pictures of it below. And the final specimen was a rather cool looking harry specimen growing on a stick. It is thought that it belongs to the genus Helmenthosporium although a full identification has not yet been made.

Species list entered by Richard Jacob. Species identified by Fluff Berger, Richard Jacob, John Plischke III and Garrett Taylor.

List of species found on the walk at Salamander park:

Armillaria gallica (Honey Mushroom),
Cerrena unicolor (Mossy Maze Polypore),
Ganoderma applanatum (Artist’s Conk),
Irpex lacteus (Milk-white Toothed-Polypore),
Kretzschmaria deusta (Carbon Cushion, Brittle Cinder),
Phellinus robiniae (Cracked cap polypore, Locust polypore),
Polyporus badius (Black-footed Polypore),
Polyporus varius (),
Poronidulus conchifer (),
Sarcoscypha austriaca (Scarlet cup),
Schizophyllum commune (Split Gill),
Stereum complicatum (Crowded Parchment),
Stereum ostrea (False Turkey-tail),
Trametes elegans (),
Trametes versicolor (Turkey-tail),
Xylobolus frustulatus (Ceramic Parchment)

Species not currently on clubs life list:
Daedaleopsis septentrionalis ()

Comments:
Microscope used to ID Sarcoscypha austriaca from the spores.

Photos by Sarah Amelia, Cecily Franklin, Richard Jacob and Garrett Taylor.

Species list from Todd Nature Reserve on 03/24/2018

About 20 people attended an early spring mushroom walk at Todd Nature Reserve on Saturday, March 24th. While the temperatures were mild, a few inches of heavily compacted snow remained on several of the trails. Despite the semi-wintry conditions, several fungi species were still collected and identified. A few interesting discoveries collected by walk participant Vanessa included two Ascomycete fungi. One tiny Ascomycete fungi resembled an eyelash cup fungus, and its identity may be Scutellinia scutellata var. leucothecia. The other fungus may be a species of Tapesia, though microscopy will be necessary in order to determine the correct IDs.

Species list entered by Adam Haritan.  Species identified by John Plischke III, Judy Mackenroth, and Adam Haritan.

List of species found on the walk at Todd Nature Reserve:

Apiosporina morbosa (Black Knot of Cherry),
Daedaleopsis confragosa (Thin-maze Flat Polypore),
Daldinia concentrica (Carbon Balls),
Exidia recisa (Brown jelly roll),
Hemitrichia serpula (),
Hydnochaete olivaceus (),
Hymenochaete tabacina (Northern Brown Crust),
Irpex lacteus (Milk-white Toothed-Polypore),
Lenzites betulina (Multicolor Gill Polypore),
Lycogala epidendrum (Wolf’s Milk Slime),
Phellinus gilvus (Mustard Yellow polypore),
Phlebia radiata (),
Piptoporus betulinus (Birch Polypore),
Schizophyllum commune (Split Gill),
Stereum complicatum (Crowded Parchment),
Stereum ostrea (False Turkey-tail),
Trametes versicolor (Turkey-tail),
Trichaptum abietinum (Conifer Polypore),
Trichaptum biforme (Violet Toothed-Polypore),
Xylobolus frustulatus (Ceramic Parchment)

Species not currently on club’s life list:
Peniophora cinerea

Gary Lincoff – Memorial

It is with a sad heart that we learned of Gary Lincoff’s death on March 16, 2018. He will be remembered by the Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club for his enthusiastic life of mushroom knowledge and teaching. He was a prolific author including the well read and used National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms. Gary, an Honorary – Lifetime member of the WPMC,  was born and raised in Pittsburgh, and graduated from Taylor-Allderdice High School.

His well worn hat and vest, ever present smile and humor will be sadly missed at the next WPMC Gary Lincoff Foray on September 15, 2018.

The WPMC expresses its heartfelt condolences to Irene and Noah Lincoff. The following was posted by them on Facebook.

Hi Everyone,
This is Irene and Noah. We are deeply sad to confirm what you may have heard that our beloved Gary Lincoff passed away this morning. We are extremely touched by the outpouring of love that has already begun, and wanted to make sure that all of you know how important you were in Gary’s life. He loved this community and being able to be in touch so regularly with all of you, and we know that all of these heartfelt messages would have meant as much to him as they do to us. One of the most wonderful things about Gary was the positive impact that he was able to have on so many people and joy he was able to bring into the world. Please continue to use this page to share your experiences with Gary and what he meant to you, and we know that somewhere he is as touched by it all as we are.

We love you all.

Mushroom toxicity

You have all heard about poisonous mushrooms but do you know about the different kinds of poisonings and their symptoms?  Past president and retired doctor John Stuart gives us a break down of the different types of poisoning, symptoms, chemicals and local species involved in this detailed analysis of mushroom toxicity.

March-April 2018 newsletter

The first newsletter of 2018 has just been published and you should have received a copy by post or email. There is a new column by past-president Dick Dougall titled “The Beginner’s Corner”, photos from the annual photo contest, book reviews and lots more. If you have something to contribute please contact Cecily Franklin. You can also download the newsletter directly.

Fungi Features

The second talk of the new year taken from our archives of presentations from talks at meetings or education classes. This presentation was part of last years education class. If you want to move beyond identifying some easy to recognize common mushrooms you need to learn about mushroom features. The presentation is on Fungi features by Richard Jacob. You can see our back catalog of talks here.

Capturing Wild Mushrooms

Over the year club members give a number of talks at meetings or education classes. We like to publish as many of them as possible over the lean months of winter when there are not many walks happening to give you something to think about. You can see our back catalog of talks here.

The first talk we would like to publish this season was presented by Mark Spear at the September 2017 club meeting titled “Capturing Wild Mushrooms – Why and How”. Enjoy!

 

Species list from Winter mushroom walk at North Park on 12/16/2017

It was a cold day with snow on the ground for an aptly named winter walk but 10 hardy souls went out to see what they could find. There was a high ratio of club mycologists which helped the group find and identify a number new to the club small Ascomycota. John Plischke III wrote “Great walk and lots of very cool fungi, 3 of which have never been found by the club before but only 2 we can put names on so far.

Species list entered by Garrett Taylor. Species identified by Garrett Taylor, John Plischke III and La Monte Yarroll.

List of species found on the walk at Winter mushroom walk at North Park:
Dendrostilbella smaragdina (blue green pin heads on pins);
Diatrype stigma (),
Exidia recisa (Brown jelly roll),
Hydnochaete olivaceus (),
Hysterobrevium mori (),
Peniophora albobadia (Giraffe spots),
Phellinus gilvus (Mustard Yellow polypore),
Resupinatus applicatus (Black Jelly Oyster),
Sarea resinae (tiny cup in white pine resin)
Schizophyllum commune (Split Gill),
Stereum complicatum (Crowded Parchment),
Stereum ostrea (False Turkey-tail),
Trametes hirsuta (),
Trichaptum biforme (Violet Toothed-Polypore),
Xenasmatella vaga (),
Xylobolus frustulatus (Ceramic Parchment)

Comments:
Lopadostoma sp.
Garrett writes “I am working on a few more at least one to come, there were some tentatives and a couple we had to Genus only.”

Species list from Black Friday walk at Hartwood Acres on 11/24/2017

About 15 people spent the morning hunting for bargains err mushrooms in Hartwood acres. The weather was clear which meant a cool start but it warmed up nicely by lunchtime. Nothing was really in abundance but there was a good mixture of species found from small ascomycetes to larger mushrooms. Standouts were Cudoniella acicularis (Oak Pin), identified by Adam Haritan that had not been previously identified by the club and a solitary beautiful Parrot mushroom. Other species of note was Radulomyces copelandii (Asian beauty) an invasive species. There were a number of edible mushrooms brought to the table: Brick tops, Blewits and late fall oysters along with some other species that were past their prime. Finally quite a few crust and parchment mushrooms were brought in and identified.

Species identified by Sarah Banach, Adam Haritan, Richard Jacob Judy Mackenroth, John Plischke III and Jim Wasik. Species list entered by Richard Jacob.

List of species found on the walk at Black Friday walk at Hartwood Acres:
Ascocoryne sarcoides (Purple Jelly Drops),
Bisporella citrina (Yellow Fairy Cups),
Clitocybe subconnexa (),
Clitocybe nuda (Blewit),
Cudoniella acicularis (),
Daedalea quercina (Thick-maze Oak Polypore),
Daldinia concentrica (Carbon Balls),
Diatrype stigma (),
Exidia recisa (Brown jelly roll),
Galerina marginata (),
Ganoderma applanatum (Artist’s Conk),
Gliophorus psittacinus (Parrot Mushroom),
Gloeoporus dichrous (),
Hemitrichia serpula (),
Hericium erinaceus (Bearded Tooth),
Hydnochaete olivaceus (),
Hymenochaete tabacina (Northern Brown Crust),
Hypholoma lateritium (Brick top),
Irpex lacteus (Milk-white Toothed-Polypore),
Ischnoderma resinosum (Resinous Polypore),
Laetiporus sulphureus (Chicken Mushroom; Sulphur Shelf),
Lycogala terrestre (),
Morganella pyriformis (Pear-shaped Puffball),
Nectria cinnabarina (Coral Spot Fungus),
Neofavolus alveolaris (Hexagonal-pored Polypore),
Panellus serotinus (Late Fall Oyster),
Peniophora albobadia (Giraffe spots),
Phlebia radiata (),
Phyllotopsis nidulans (Mock Oyster),
Radulomyces copelandii (Asian beauty),
Resupinatus applicatus (Black Jelly Oyster),
Schizophyllum commune (Split Gill),
Schizopora paradoxa (),
Scutellinia scutellata (Reddish Eyelash Cup),
Scutellinia setosa (),
Serpula lacrimans (Dry rot),
Stereum complicatum (Crowded Parchment),
Stereum ostrea (False Turkey-tail),
Trametes gibbosa (Lumpy bracket),
Trametes versicolor (Turkey-tail),
Tremella foliacea (Jelly Leaf),
Trichaptum biforme (Violet Toothed-Polypore),
Tubaria furfuracea (Fringed Tubaria),
Xylobolus frustulatus (Ceramic Parchment)

Species not identified to species level:
Psathyrella sp.
Phellinus sp
Mycena sp.

Rather than using the species name Trametes elegans I have used Trametes gibbosa.
I identified Scutellinia setosa using a microscope looking at spores from the same location a couple of weeks ago but I forgot the specimen home to check but I presume that it is the same thing.