Reagent kits

Two types of reagent kits were made available at the Lincoff foray, a Chemical field test kit and a Microscope stain kit. Complete set of safety data sheets and documentation for the chemicals included in the kits are on the USB kit that came with the Science Sunday registration, in the “\Reagent Kits\Safety Data Sheets” Directory. These documents can also be found online here:

http://wpamushroomclub.org/wp/WP_Science_Sunday/Reagent_Kits.zip

Most of the chemicals and stains are quite safe. Obviously you should not drink the liquids or put them in your eyes. Some of the microscope stains will stain your skin, clothing, kitchen counter tops etc. For this reason we recommend wearing latex or nitrile gloves whenever you use any of the reagents. You can easily purchase these gloves from Amazon and other online suppliers. We also recommend protecting the counter top where you work and wearing “rough” clothes that you are not worried about staining.

Over time the chemicals in the bottles may corrode or denature the rubber bulbs of the droppers. Take care when you use the kits and make sure this has not happened. If the rubber has deteriorated you will need to replace the dropper or whole bottle. The club may have some reserves or you can purchase 1oz bottles  on Amazon.

Microscope stain kit contents

  • 1% Congo Red
  • 1% Phloxine B
  • Safranin
  • Lactophenol Cotton Blue
  • Melzer’s Reagent
  • Potassium hydroxide 2%

Chemical Field test kit contents

  • Ammonia (NH3)
  • Ferrous sulphate 10%
  • Potassium hydroxide 10%
  • Vanillin (1 gram)
  • Sulfuric acid 1N
  • Hydrochloric acid 32%
  • Lugol’s Iodine 5%

 

Warning – blue bottles in the Chemical field test kit contain corrosive acids

The two blue bottles in the Chemical filed test kit contain strong corrosive acids that are a health hazard. Use only while wearing gloves and safety glasses in a well ventilated area. If they come in contact with skin or eyes wash immediately with copious amounts of water and call a doctor. The Hydrochloric acid in particular is fuming and gives off a sharp and extremely irritating odor.

Proper Care for Hydrochloric Acid Exposure

Depending on the concentration of the hydrochloric acid you are working with, accidental exposure can occur as skin contact, eye contact, ingestion or inhalation of acidic vapors. Each of these types of exposure can pose serious hazards to your health and should be managed immediately.

Skin Contact – If hydrochloric acid comes into contact with your skin, flush immediately with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes, and remove any contaminated clothing. In case of serious skin contact, use water, a disinfectant soap, and anti-bacterial cream. Seek immediate medical attention.

Eye Contact – If hydrochloric acid or acidic mists get into your eyes, immediately flush with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes. Seek immediate medical attention.

Ingestion – If swallowed, do not induce vomiting. Seek immediate medical attention.

Inhalation – If you inhale hydrochloric acid vapors or mists, seek fresh air and medical attention immediately.

Hydrochloric Acid Storage and Disposal

Hydrochloric acid should be stored in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from sources of moisture. Keep away from incompatible materials such as oxidizing agents, organic materials, metals and alkalis. Hydrochloric acid has the ability to corrode metallic surfaces. Keep container tightly closed and store in a safe place.

Proper Care for Sulfuric Acid Exposure

Exposure to sulfuric acid can occur as skin/bodily contact, ingestion, or inhalation of vapors. Each type of exposure can pose serious hazards to your health and should be managed immediately and appropriately by a medical professional to minimize damage and health risks.

Skin Contact – If sulfuric acid comes into contact with your skin, immediately flush the affected area gently with lukewarm water for at least 30 uninterrupted minutes. Seek medical attention immediately.

Eye Contact – If sulfuric acid gets into your eyes, immediately flush the eye(s) with water for at least 30 minutes. Seek medical attention immediately.

Ingestion – If you ingest sulfuric acid, rinse your mouth immediately with water. Do not induce vomiting. Continually rinse your mouth with water and seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Inhalation – If you inhale sulfuric acid aerosols, seek fresh air and medical attention immediately.

Sulfuric Acid Storage and Disposal

Sulfuric acid or products that contain concentrated sulfuric acid should be stored in a cool, dry area away from direct sunlight and heat sources. Sulfuric acid should not be stored indoors in large quantities, to prevent the possible accumulation of vapors. Product containers should be regularly examined by professional MSDS experts for signs of damage or leaks.